Advantages of Membership in the Northwest Environmental Business Council By Brian D. Chenoweth

Located in environmentally friendly Portland, Oregon, the Northwest Environmental Business Council seeks to advance the cause of sustainable growth. The forward-thinking organization’s membership ranges from scientists and engineers to business support professionals.

The Northwest Environmental Business Council’s members work to advance fields like land use, greenhouse gas management, design and construction, and waste and recycling. The member’s diversity of knowledge and experience fosters mutual learning and provides an environment in which they can formulate cross-sector solutions to industrial issues.

In addition to the opportunities for learning and developing cross-sector solutions, the Northwest Environmental Business Council also offers excellent networking opportunities. Members can attend a variety of luncheons, trade shows, and industry events to learn about the latest developments in environmental policy. This network also helps connect members to customers, regulators, and legislators.

About Brian D. Chenoweth

Brian Chenoweth, JD, currently serves as Managing Partner at Chenoweth Law Group PC. Headquartered in the Pacific Northwest, this firm focuses on land use and environmental litigation. Mr. Chenoweth is a member of the Northwest Environmental Business Council.

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Brian D. Chenowith on Proper Hiking Etiquette

With thousands of miles of trails to choose from, Oregon offers visitors some of the most spectacular hiking on earth. To ensure that trails remain healthy and well-maintained, here are a few tips on proper hiking etiquette.

First, observe the “leave no trace” maxim. This principle encourages people to enjoy the outdoors responsibly by exercising certain ethical practices. Educational programs throughout the country teach hikers to minimize their impact by planning for all weather, traveling in small groups, and taking with them all garbage and equipment they introduce to the environment.

Next, hikers should be well-informed about their hiking location. They should be aware of all rules and regulations, and if possible, should schedule trips when park use is not at its highest.

Finally, hikers should be respectful of all flora and fauna, refraining from picking plants or flowers or approaching wildlife, and properly disposing of all waste materials. By practicing common sense and respect for the environment and fellow hikers, Oregon’s trails will remain treasures for years to come.

About the Author: Brian D. Chenoweth is a Portland-based lawyer with a keen passion for the diverse nature and hiking the area has to offer.